Tag Archives: Dementia-risks

Feeling Lonely Increases Dementia Risks

By: Dr. Pascale Michelon

Loneliness or social isolation is traditionally related to poorer health outcomes and life expectancy. The Amsterdam Study of the Elderly suggests that it may also be linked to increased risks of Alzheimer’s disease. Furthermore, feeling lonely, rather that actually being alone, may be what matters. Continue reading

Weight Training Boosts Brain Functions

By: Dr. Pascale Michelon

Physical exercise triggers the growth of both brain cells and new connections between them. Until now, aerobic exercise was the kind of exercise mostly studied. It is has been shown to boost cognitive functions and is associated with lower risks of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. A new study shows that weight training may also be protective. Continue reading

Does Brain Training Work?

By: Dr. Pascale Michelon

Cognitive training has attracted a lot of interest in the past few years. Scientific evidence that training the brain does help boost cognitive functions are slowly being collected. A recent study reviews research looking at whether cognitive training can help adults at risk of dementia. Continue reading

Can Diabetes Increase Dementia Risks?

By: Dr. Pascale Michelon

Is there a relationship between diabetes and dementia? Are people with diabetes more at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than others? Why? These questions concern as much as 11% of adults in the US. Continue reading

A Drink a Day can Decrease Risk of Memory Loss

By: Dr. Pascale Michelon

What’s the effect of alcohol on the brain? Should we drink at all? A new review suggests that moderate drinking may in fact lower risks of memory loss and Alzheimer’s Disease. Continue reading

Stimulating Mental Activities Decrease Risks of Dementia

By: Dr. Pascale Michelon

In 2002, Dr. Wilson from the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging published the results of the Religious Order Study. In this study, 801 older Catholic clergy members were followed for 4.5 years. At the beginning of the study, participants were asked how long they typically spent on cognitive activities such as viewing TV, listening to radio, reading newspapers, reading magazines, reading books, playing games such as cards, crosswords and other puzzles and going to museums. Twenty cognitive tests were used to measure mental functioning. Continue reading